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BLACKBURN B44

PostPosted: Thu Feb 03, 2011 10:57 pm
by HO229
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The beginnings of my Blackburn B44 Plug, I found this subject to be a very good match for the counter rotating motor setup I am getting ready to tinker with.
Amazingly enough this 3 View drawing is very accurate.

Re: BLACKBURN B44

PostPosted: Fri Feb 04, 2011 7:04 am
by seawings
Question: How do you get your drawings printed to that size?

Re: BLACKBURN B44

PostPosted: Fri Feb 04, 2011 11:40 am
by HO229
Bryan,
Import the image into your graphics program, scale the image to desired size and print.

I personally prefer to scale the image to 1-1 scale; then select what scale I wish to build/print to and reduce.

Copy the 1-1 image (keeping a copy of the master artwork at 1-1) and reduce the scale to your desired scale factor.
This project is scaled to match a 10 inch prop
Hope this helps (clear as mud).


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I could not resist getting it ready to be shaped (a kid in a candy store).

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Drawing off the waste

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The knife is a joy to use and removes waste FAST.

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Just a few hours of effort left with the half model, then fair the other side to match


Cheers,
Dave

Re: BLACKBURN B44

PostPosted: Mon Feb 07, 2011 4:57 am
by BillG
Looks good Dave. The template method reminds me of how I used to sculpt solid foam scratch builds. Sculpting from solid sections was my favorite scratch building method, until I got better at using enlarged grainy 3-view for balsa builds.
Certainly not the level of woodwork you're doing there, but I just came up from the basement, after milling grooves in a set of old solid wooded wheels, for seating tubing tires around them.. Hope you're proud of me. :D
I've started a Dayton Wright RB1 scratch build on Wattflyer in the Scratch and Kit Built forum.
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Re: BLACKBURN B44

PostPosted: Mon Feb 07, 2011 1:16 pm
by HO229
Bill,
Your rims look fantastic! I use the drill press frequently to spin out parts, spinners and such.
Someday when I am not so busy I am going to make a lathe attachment for my little Press. Lathes are basically drill presses less the center. I own a lathe but it is out in my shed; it is always a bother to go and set everything up for little parts that could be fabricated on the little bench-top lathe/press.

Dayton Wright RB1 is a beautiful aircraft with nice lines; that era of aircraft design produced some very impressive looking aircraft.

The B44 is a fun little project; armed with a nice 3 view, a set of dividers, and a square I quickly cut it out. I have a bit of waste removal and fairing to do at the cockpit and forward but the lion’s share of the work is complete. I will be very satisfied when the half model is complete, fairing the opposing side will be enjoyable and quick!

Dave

Re: BLACKBURN B44

PostPosted: Mon Feb 14, 2011 11:36 pm
by HO229
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Half model complete, i will most likely cut the canopy area off and spin out a part on the lathe

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Striking resemblance to the Saro A1, I believe I know were the inspiration behind the A1 shape came from.

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Re: BLACKBURN B44

PostPosted: Tue Feb 15, 2011 3:46 am
by BillG
seawings wrote:Question: How do you get your drawings printed to that size?

He obviously starts with drawings that have cleaner lines, than some of my enlarged drawings. :lol:
The lines don't look like staircases, and the enlarged print still look pretty clean.

Dave I'm amazed that the shaping of solid wood at these large scales. The mold is looking great. When I was a kid, I carved a collection of boats from hardwood, when we had a summer cottage on a lake. They were only about 1/72 scale though. :D

Re: BLACKBURN B44

PostPosted: Fri Feb 18, 2011 6:00 pm
by HO229
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Not much left to clean up, a little primmer and some putty to apply


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Primmer really shows/highlights all the flaws/inperfections

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Getting close

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One positive aspect of having a few irons in the fire, you do not have to waste the excess filler.
A little filler goes a long way when filling small voids