Loening XSL2 at 48" span

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Re: Loening XSL2 at 48" span

Postby BillG » Thu Nov 18, 2010 4:54 am

Some recent progress. Since I'll be home tomorrow, I may almost be able to finish the model then.

Spring door battery hold setup, versus velcro which I have lost interest in for battery securing, for several reasons. Begin inserting battery by pushing against the rubber foam tab which is glued to the door.
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The battery will cause the spring loaded door to lift due to the angle cut on the foam rubber locking tab, without having to get your finger in there to lift the door.
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The spring loaded door closes with the battery fully inserted, and the foam rubber locking tab is now against the end of the battery, locking it in place.
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Laminated thin basswood strip h-stab struts, notched with short CF spar lengths glued in one end for gluing into the fuse, and alum tubing glued over, flattened, bent and drilled on the other end.
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Instrument panel printed from photo of Bucker BU180 Student, since it looked reasonable for the period, it fit, and I have no clue what the panel in this plane looks like.
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Removable floor to cover servos and receiver, along with magnetic pilot attachment.
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Almost finished with that less than favorite covering stage.
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Floats struts made from K&S aluminum tubing.
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I had just enough Fourmost Products edge trim, for a nice touch around the cocpit.
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BillG
 
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Re: Loening XSL2 at 48" span

Postby BillG » Mon Nov 22, 2010 6:04 am

The plane came out lighter than I expected, thanks to Coverite Microlite, and the light wing design. Differential ailerons and an aileron-rudder mix has also been programmed.

If you're reading Roy, I could have used slightly heavier sheeting for the rear fuse, and the additional weight wouldn't have broke the bank. This plane should fly like a glider, given the size and wing load. I ended up removing the front battery tray, and mounted the battery under the pilot on the floor, for a 26% chord cg setting. The plane was actually nose heavy, with the battery in front. BTW, how is the Dornier coming along?

Specs:
Span: 48"
AUW: 32.5oz (2lbs, 1/2oz) w/3s-1800 PQ lipo
Power system: Eflite Park 480 outrunner and GWS 1170 HD prop cut to 10.5"
Wing area: 394 sq-in (2.74 sq-ft)
Wing loading: 11.9 oz/sq-ft
CG: 26% chord

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BillG
 
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Re: Loening XSL2 at 48" span

Postby TASSE » Tue Nov 23, 2010 8:18 pm

Hi Will, thats looking great.
My Dornier has been shelved for the moment as i have been busy doing new drawings for my web site. As well as that my workshop is bitter cold as its an old church and very big but i am having the heating seen to. All should be well about January when i will start again.

When are you going to fly your Curtiss ?

Cheers Roy.
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Re: Loening XSL2 at 48" span

Postby BillG » Wed Nov 24, 2010 10:24 pm

TASSE wrote:Hi Will, thats looking great.
My Dornier has been shelved for the moment as i have been busy doing new drawings for my web site. As well as that my workshop is bitter cold as its an old church and very big but i am having the heating seen to. All should be well about January when i will start again.

When are you going to fly your Curtiss ?

Cheers Roy.

Thanks. Hopefully I'll fly the Curtiss soon. If I don't get it to a lake, I think I'll take the opportunity of the first snowfall, to give it a shot. It was nearly cold enough today for snow, so it may be soon. The "no heat" shop comments had me thinking about today: I stripped a prepped an area of Adam's house (good friend I work for) over a month ago, and we've been too busy to finish it since. As today is the day before a major holiday, it ended up being a good day to finish it. I'm almost never cold while working, but painting in 1 degree C weather while holding onto a cold aluminum ladder with bare hands and wearing thin stockings, will put the chill into you. I can understand that it would be difficult to work on the models in the cold.
Bill
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