Short Flying Boats in New Zealand

This is the place to discuss particular Shorts Flying Boat types and post documents, photographs and other relevant information appertaining to these craft.

Re: Short Flying Boats in New Zealand

Postby flyernzl » Thu Mar 24, 2011 11:22 am

Short S.25 Sunderland III ML795 had been built by Shorts at Rochester, shop order no.SB46668 and was bought on charge with the Air Council on 23Sep1944. This aircraft departed RAF Mount Batten on 28Oct1944 with Flt Lt Jack Pettit as Captain to travel alongside ML793 to Lauthala Bay in Fiji. ML795 flew to Auckland on 2Dec1944. This trip took ML795 124hrs 45mins flying hours.

Upon arrival at Hobsonville, ML795 was bought on charge as NZ4104 on 4Dec1944, had the ferry equipment removed and was fitted out for military freight and passenger transport operations. As part of the Flying Boat Transport Flight, the name 'Takitimu' was applied to NZ4104, the name of one of the original Maori migration canoes from early New Zealand settlement.

NZ4104 was employed on the Auckland - Suva and Auckland - Noumea - Espirutu Santo routes from February to October 1945, losing its wartime camouflage in favour of a natural metal finish after VJ day.

NZ4104 at Mechanics Bay while in service with the FBTF, another Sunderland gets engine maintenance in the foreground

Image

NZ4104 was then laid up at Hobsonville in October 1945 awaiting resolution of the engine/propeller problems that had surfaced during Pacific Service.

In storage at Hobsonville

Image

By January 1946, civilian use for the Sunderland fleet had been identified, and conversion of NZ4103/ZK-AMG to a 26 passenger civilian standard had started at Hobsonville, with work om NZ4102/ZK-AMF to follow. As already discussed, the conversion work on NZ4102 apparently ran into difficulties and NZ4104 was selected to replace it.
Ownership of NZ4104 was therefore transferred to the NZ National Airways Corporation and the aircraft became ZK-AMK on 22Dec1947 equiped to carry 26 passengers.
ZK-AMK was operated alongside ZK-AMG on the Auckland - Suva - Labasa route, making its last commercial flight on 1Jun50.

ZK-AMK moored out at Mechanics Bay

Image

Under maintenance at Hobsonville

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Moored out at Hobsonville

Image

After its service with NZNAC, ZK-AMK was returned to the RNZAF, where is was placed in storage at Hobsonville. It was bought back on charge as NZ4104 so that it could be offered for sale by tender on 28May1951, but it was not sold at that time.
By now, the purchase of the ex-RAF Sunderland Mk.5 fleet was imminent so NZ4104 was repainted back into military colours and used by 6 Squadron to train crews in the water handling and beaching procedures of these aircraft. Deemed seaworthy but not airworthy, NZ4104 carried out these duties from May 1952 until mid-1953.
The civil registration ZK-AMK was not cancelled until 8Jul1952.

NZ4104 at Hobsonville 1953 in its last livery, simplified by just overpainting the civilian registration

Image

Image

Feathered friend inspecting the starboard wingtip

Image

Following this episode, NZ4104 was again offered for sale by tender on 23Nov1953. This time, a sale was concluded and the scrapman cometh.

However, the ghost of ZK-AMK lives on.
When you are passing through the Wellington Airport domestic terminal, walk through to the departure shopping area, turn right walk along the rear wall until you come to the escalators that take you up to the third floor conference and Qantas domestic lounge complex. In the foyer of this third floor area is a glass case containing a nice model of Short Sunderland III ZK-AMK. On the wall above this model is a framed tribute to Brian Layne, one of the Sunderland transport pilots. Well worth a look and not many people know that it is there.

Image

Image

next: ZK-AML
Last edited by flyernzl on Sat Mar 10, 2012 5:36 am, edited 2 times in total.
User avatar
flyernzl
 
Posts: 272
Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 11:05 pm

Re: Short Flying Boats in New Zealand

Postby flyernzl » Thu Mar 31, 2011 10:43 am

Under political pressure, TEAL had ordered four Solent flying boats from Shorts.
The Solent was a civilian development of the 1945 Military Short Seaford, a larger and heavier aircraft than the Sunderland.
The Solent had developed from the 30 passenger Solent 2 to the 39 passenger Solent 3 between 1946 and 1949.
Mindful of the engine and overheating problems encountered with their Sandringhams, TEAL opted for a more powerful and heavier version which became the Solent 4. This version of the Short Solent carried 44 passengers and employed four 2040hp Bristol Hercules 733 engines.

The first of the TEAL Solents, ZK-AML c/n SH.1556, was built by Shorts at Belfast, and was christened 'Aotearoa II' by H.R.H. Princess Elizabeth (later Queen Elizabeth II) at a ceremony held at Belfast on 26May1949.
ZK-AML was the subject of a number of Shorts publicity photographs taken during its test flights, and these are relatively commonly found on the internet.

ZK-AML photographed during a test flight by Shorts prior to departure for New Zealand

Image

Apparently ZK-AML spent some months of 1949 at the factory, as delivery of this aircraft to TEAL did not occur until late that year. Commanded by Captains I. Patterson and F. Whillans, ZK-AML arrived at Auckland on 7Dec1949 having set a new record time of 5 hours 37 minutes for the trans-Tasman crossing.
In common with last of the Sandringhams ZK-AMH, ZK-AML arrived with the Union Jack flag painted on the fin.

ZK-AML on the hard at Mechanics Bay in its early TEAL colours compete with the British flag

Image

ZK-AML then entered line service with TEAL, making its first Auckland-Sydney-Auckland flight (Captain J.R. McGrane) on 21Dec1949. With the modernization of aircraft, TEAL could now operate Auckland - Sydney, Wellington - Sydney, services to the Chatham Islands, and the Auckland - Fiji - Samoa - Cook Islands - Tahiti service, later famous as The Coral Route.

In December 1953 ZK-AML again met Princess Elizabeth, now Queen Elizabeth, when it carried her and the Royal party from from Suva to Lautoka and return, then to Tonga. Captain J R McGrane commanded the Solent. This was the first flight on commercial airliner by Royal Family.

ZK-AML moored out at Mechanics Bay, now showing the New Zealand Ensign on the fin

Image

On the hard at Mechanics Bay

Image

Solents were not just daytime birds! An arty nighttime shot

Image

In final TEAL colours, 'TEAL' across the top of the tailplane and modified fuselage cheatline and logo

Image

Image

With the breakup of British Commonwealth Pacific Airlines, in which New Zealand held a shareholding, TEAL acquired three Douglas DC-6 aircraft. This would lead to the winding down of TEAL's flying boat operations.
ZK-AML carried out the last Solent Wellington-Sydney service on 25Jun1954 (commanded by Captains C Le Couteur and N Clarke) and the last Solent Sydney-Auckland service on 27Jun1954 (commanded by Captains J Shephard and B Whyte).
At the end of June, ZK-AML was withdrawn from service and offered for sale.

Early in 1955 ZK-AML was bought by Aquila Airways Ltd. of Hamble, who operated charter flights from the UK to Lisbon and Madeira using ex-BOAC Hythe class Sandringhams. It was ferried to the UK and became G-AOBL on 5May1955 along with Solent 4 ZK-AMN which had become G-ANYI on 16Jan1955.
This pair of more powerful Solent 4s gave Aquila Airways the capacity to fly direct to Madeira and also Las Palmas in the Canary Isles.
Aquila Airways suffered a downturn in trade during the later years, and ownership of G-AOBL was transferred to Aerovia Aquilas Ltda in 1Oct1958. Flying boat operations ceased by the end of 1958, and the company's aircraft were left to become derelict on a beach in the Tagus Estuary near Lisbon, Portugal.
G-AOBL's CofA expired 17Apr59 and the aircraft lay dormant until scrapped in August 1971.

Next: ZK-AMM
Last edited by flyernzl on Sat Apr 16, 2011 11:55 am, edited 2 times in total.
User avatar
flyernzl
 
Posts: 272
Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 11:05 pm

Re: Short Flying Boats in New Zealand

Postby sunderlandmr5 » Fri Apr 01, 2011 10:16 am

Peter

Again, thanks for the awesome photos and commentary. :D :D :D

It would have been so nice if someone/persons in the RNZAF/Government
in the late 1940's/early 1950's had the forethought to preserve
one of the Mk III's.

I drove past MOTAT yesterday with one of my work colleagues'
and his comment when he saw the Solent outside was "Wow"
look at that. I just grinned and thought yes, she's beautiful!!!

I wish more New Zealanders would take an interest in
our Flying Boat History.

Thanks/regards

Alan
sunderlandmr5
 
Posts: 153
Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 9:25 am
Location: Auckland, New Zealand

Re: Short Flying Boats in New Zealand

Postby flyernzl » Sat Apr 09, 2011 1:28 am

The second of the TEAL Solents, ZK-AMM c/n SH.1557, was built by Shorts at Belfast, and was named 'Ararangi'.
As ZK-AML was delayed in the UK, ZK-AMM was the first of the TEAL Solents to appear in New Zealand, arriving on 29Sep1949 commanded by Captains C. Griffiths and F. Kilgour.
Entry into commercial service did not take long, ZK-AMM carried out the first Solent Auckland - Sydney passenger flight on the 14th November, Captains A. Jury and T. Brewer.
With Solents ZK-AMN ZK-AMO and ZK-AML following in the next few months, the Sandringhams were withdrawn from the trans-Tasman service after 19Dec1949.

Solent ZK-AMM at Mechanics Bay late 1949 with Sandringham ZK-AME and TEAL Catalina ZK-AMP in the background

Image

Image

In common with the post-war deliveries, ZK-AMM arrived with the Union Jack painted on the fin

ZK-AMM on the Mechanics Bay buoy.

Image

We now have lesson time. You have your Solent nice and secure on the hard

Image

So how do you get it back into the water? Slowly, very slowly . . .

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Full marks for that effort guys!

Sister Solent ZK-AMN arrived in October 1949

Image

ZK-AMM carried ot the first TEAL Wellington-Sydney scheduled service 3Oct1950, commanded by Captains C. Griffiths and T. Brewer.

At some point in the early 1050s, the New Zealand ensign appeared on the fin of ZK-AMM.

ZK-AMM on full-power take-off, Waitemata Harbour

Image

A nice sequence of ZK-AMM in the Mechanics Bay circuit, taken from further along the waterfront

Image

Image

Image

Image

and, after alighting, taxiing in to base

Image

Image

By now, TEALs maintenance facilities at Mechanics Bay had been developed, and civil aircraft no longer had to maintaned at Hobsonville.

ZK-AMM on the hard at Mechanics Bay

Image

Image

On 7Apr1954 ZK-AMM carried out the last TEAL Wellington-Chatham Islands service (which had been operated on a once-every-three-months basis) commanded by Captains C Le Couteur and M Wallace. RNZAF Sunderlands and chartered Australian Sandringhams then took over flights on this route until an airstrip suitable for DC-3s and Bristol Freighters was built in 1957.

The following month, on 28th May1954, ZK-AMM was badly damaged in a port inner engine fire while under maintenance at Mechanics Bay I have been unable to source exact details of this incident (was the aircraft afloat or on land?) and would appreciate more details if anyone can elucidate.

Update:
I have now spoken to Eddie Trudeau, who was flying for TEAL at the time of this incident. He states that ZK-AMM was up on the hard at Mechanics Bay undergoing maintenance on the engines. At the same time, some work was being carried out on the fuel tanks in the wing. A spark from the engine maintenance ignited spilt fuel, and the aircraft caught fire.


The aircraft was sufficently badly damaged that, after any useful parts had been removed, it was sold for scrap in 1955. This was the only TEAL flying boat to be destroyed during service with the airline.

Next: ZK-AMN
Last edited by flyernzl on Wed Aug 17, 2011 12:41 am, edited 4 times in total.
User avatar
flyernzl
 
Posts: 272
Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 11:05 pm

Re: Short Flying Boats in New Zealand

Postby flyernzl » Tue Apr 12, 2011 10:27 am

The third of the TEAL Solents, ZK-AMN c/n SH.1558, was built by Shorts at Belfast, and was named 'Awatere'.
ZK-AMN was the second of the TEAL Solents to appear in New Zealand, arriving on 23Oct1949 and commencing work on the trans-Tasman service on 16Nov1949 commanded by Captain C. Griffiths.
In common with the late Short boats, ZK-AMN arrived with the Union Jack painted on the fin.

ZK-AMN at Mechanics Bay soon after delivery, apparently undergoing some engine replacement work.

Image

The Union Jack was soon replaced with the more appropriate New Zealand ensign

ZK-AMN arriving at the Mechanics Bay terminal

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

On the hard at Mechnics Bay, the nose of TEAL Catalina ZK-AMP is also visible

Image

Image

Solent maintenance could also be carried out while the aircraft was moored, ZK-AMN receives attention at Evans Bay (Wellington)

Image

ZK-AMN was the object of interest at some sort of open day

Image

Image

Image

The final TEAL Solent livery is shown here as worn by ZK-AMN while moored at Evans Bay

Image

Image

and while performing a low pass at an airshow. The Bristol Freighter is probably one of the SAFE aircraft.

Image

ZK-AMN appears to have led an unspectacular life while with TEAL, and was withdrawn from use in mid-1954 after the DC-6s arrived.
Along with ZK-AML it was sold to Aquila Airways Ltd., Hamble becoming G-ANYI 16Jan1955.
Ownership was transferred to Aerovia Aquilas Ltda in October 1958 but it was withdrawn from use at Lisbon after CofA expired 17Apr59.
Left mouldering on the banks of the Tagus Estuary for years, it was finally scrapped in August 1971.

Next: ZK-AMO
Last edited by flyernzl on Fri Apr 29, 2011 9:59 am, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar
flyernzl
 
Posts: 272
Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 11:05 pm

Re: Short Flying Boats in New Zealand

Postby flyernzl » Sun Apr 17, 2011 7:29 am

The last of the four Solent 4s ordered by TEAL was c/n SH.1559 which, after completion by Shorts at Belfast, became ZK-AMO in early November 1949 and was named 'Aranui'.
The aircraft arrived at Auckland on 30Nov1949, and carried out its first commercial Auckland-Sydney service on the 19th December commanded by Captain D.W. Keesing.

ZK-AMO moored at Mechnics Bay soon after arrival, with the NZNAC Sunderland III ZK-AMK visible further out

Image

Image

ZK-AMO, still showing the Union Jack on the fin, taxiing out from departure from Mechanics Bay

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Undergoing servicing on the hard at Mechanics Bay. Note the TEAL hangar under construction at that time.

Image

By 1951, NZNAC had extended its Sunderland III Pacific Service from Fiji to Aitutaki, Cook Islands at the same time as an Air Tahiti service linked French Polynesia with Nandi. These regional services connected with the BCPA Pacific route from Auckland to Vancouver. With the arrival of the Solents and the immenant withdrawal of the Sunderlands, these routes were to be handed over to TEAL and the service extended to Tahiti.
At that time, the Tahitian capital of Papeete did not possess a land airport. All international flights to the city had to land at the ex-US base at Bora Bora and then transfer by Catalina flying boats to travel to the city.

The airport at Bora Bora. Even today, to leave the airport without travelling by air you must take the boat!

Image

The modern airport at Fa'aa, Papeete. The flying boat services terminated here prior to the runway construction

Image

Thus to prepare for the proposed service, TEAL employed the Boeing PB2B-1 Catalina ZK-AMP as a survey aircraft.
The route was devloped over time, and became famous as The Coral Route. Travel times were long: Auckland - (7.30hrs) - Suva, Fiji - (3.45hrs) - Apia, Samoa - (5.00hrs) - Aitutaki, Cook Islands - (4.05hrs) - Papeete,Tahiti.
Over night stops were at Suva and Apia, then the flight left Samoa well before daylight to arrive in Aitutaki in the Cook Islands early in the morning. Aitutaki was intended just as a refuelling stop, and the passengers would leave the aircraft for just a few hours before reboarding for Tahiti.
Aitutaki is around 40 minutes flying time from Rarotonga, and already possessed a sizeable wartime airfield. The logisics of the service meant that all fuel and food had to be shipped to Rarotonga, on to Aitutaki and then out over the lagoon to the islet Motu Akaiami which at that time was uninhabited.
A stone jetty was built on Motu Akaiami so that passengers and supplies could be transferred out to the Solent, and a small building constructed to give the passengers shelter.

Aerial view of Aitutaki, the airfiled is located at the top right of the island and the flying boat area arrowed.

Image

Map of Aitutaki showing the location of the TEAL depot and alighting areas

Image

View of the remains of the stone jetty as seen in 2004

Image

At high tide, thats me trying not to get my feet wet on the jetty

Image

After the Catalina had set up the route, Solent III ZK-AMQ captained by J.R. McGrane and P.F. Le Couteur left Auckland on 28Nov1951 for Tahiti via Suva-Aitutaki on a proving flight. It returned to Auckland on 8 December. Following this flight, ZK-AMQ "Aparima" (Captain J.R. McGrane) carried out the first commercial service on the Coral Route departing Auckland on the 27th December. The return service commenced on 31 December and returned to Auckland on 4 January, 1952.
Initially the service operated on a monthly basis, but by May 1952 had increased to once every two weeks.

ZK-AMO in later TEAL colours moored at Aitutaki

Image

Part of a documentry made about the Coral Route, with a slightly inaccurate commentary

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2E_uzVv7hTg

By 1954 the Solents were being replaced on most TEAL services by land-based aircraft. However, the Coral Route was maintained by ZK-AMO with Solent 3 ZK-AMQ initialy used as a reserve aircraft, later Australian Sandringhams were hired to cover for maintenance.

ZK-AMO moored at the Mechanics Bay buoy

Image

The end finally came in 1960, the service having become quite uneconomic.

ZK-AMO departing Lauthala Bay, Fiji, on the final service back to Auckland 14Sep1960, Captain J Shephard.

Image

Image

Image

Image

Once back in Auckland, ZK-AMO was decomissioned and taken to storage at Hobsonville. I do not know who was responsible for the decision to retain the aircraft as a museum piece, but that was certainly a far-sighted move. The Museum of Transport and Technology was still in the formative stages at that time, but the aircraft was held at Hobsonville until they were ready to accept it.

ZK-AMO in storage at Hobsonville 1961

Image

Lined up with three redundant RNZAF Sunderlands at Hobsonville 1964

Image

Finally, in May 1966 the Solent was returned to the water and towed down the harbour to be dragged back up on land at the new Meola Road site for MoTAT. The engines and rudder were removed for this shift.

Image

Neville Mines was involved with MoTAT at this time, and has kindly supplied photos of the arrival at the museum

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

Image

The engines were brought down from Hobsonville to Western Springs by truck, and re-installed after the move had been completed

Image

Reassembled at the MoTAT site, ZK-AMO appeared in sound condition in the late 1960s.

Image

However, 23 years of exposure to the elements took there toll, and serious work had to wait until a new hangar was built and ZK-AMO was finally moved inside in 1989.
At this time, external and inernal remedial work took place over many years, and when completed the Solent presented an impressive sight. Access stairs allowed for viewing of the interior.

Image

As the MoTAT aircraft collection expanded, and funding was raised for a larger hangar extension. This entailed ZK-AMO being taken back outside while the new building work is underway during 2010-2011

Image

Image

When the new building has been completed in late 2011, both ZK-AMO and the Sunderland NZ4115 will be able to be protected from the elements and preserved for all to admire.

Next: ZK-AMQ[code][/code]
Last edited by flyernzl on Sat Jun 18, 2011 10:45 am, edited 13 times in total.
User avatar
flyernzl
 
Posts: 272
Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 11:05 pm

Re: Short Flying Boats in New Zealand

Postby flyernzl » Sun Apr 17, 2011 9:23 am

ZK-AMP was not a Short product, so we won't be covering that aircraft here.

Image
User avatar
flyernzl
 
Posts: 272
Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 11:05 pm

Re: Short Flying Boats in New Zealand

Postby flyernzl » Thu Apr 21, 2011 9:52 am

With the operational efficiency and reliability of the Solent 4s and the establishment of new routes, demand for airline seats increased and TEAL found themselves running out of capacity. They needed another Solent, but Shorts had ceased to build this type of aircraft.
Therefore TEAL had to cast around the second-hand market and, of course, only the earlier versions of the Solent were available.

Eventually, they were able to obtain a Solent from the British Overseas Airways Corporation. This was G-AKNR, c/n S.1296 which had originally been constructed at Rochester as a Short Seaford 1 with the military serial NJ204 in 1946. It was converted to a Solent 3 at Belfast and was registered as G-AKNR to the Ministry of Civil Aviation 27Apr1949. During its service with BOAC it carried the name 'City of Belfast'.

G-AKNR arrived at TEAL's Mechanics Bay base 15Sep1951 and apparently at that time carried full TEAL colours but still bore the British registration and the 'City of Belfast' name.

It would appear that these photos were taken at Mechanics Bay soon after that arrival and before the Solent becam ZK-AMQ 'Aparima' on 8Nov1951.

In the braby

Image

Image

Image

Image

On the hard at Mechanics Bay. Note that the Union Jack on the fin has now been changed to the New Zealand ensign. The RNZAF Catalina in the background appears to be NZ4050

Image

Image

ZK-AMQ, being of lower power that the other Solents in the fleet, appears to have been used largely as a reserve aircraft and pioneered the Coral Route flights.
After the Catalina ZK-AMP had set up the route, Solent III ZK-AMQ captained by J.R. McGrane and P.F. Le Couteur left Auckland on 28Nov1951 for Tahiti via Suva-Aitutaki on a proving flight. It returned to Auckland on 8 December. Following this flight, ZK-AMQ "Aparima" (Captain J.R. McGrane) carried out the first commercial service on the Coral Route departing Auckland on the 27th December. The return service commenced on 31 December and returned to Auckland on 4 January, 1952.

After the demise of ZK-AMM and the sale of ZK-AML and ZK-AMN, ZK-AMQ was withdrawn from scheduled service on 19Jun1954 and kept in reserve as a backup for ZK-AMO which was operating the Coral Route.
This aircraft was needed in 1955, when ZK-AMO had to be removed from service in March for main spar modification work.
ZK-AMQ was removed from storage on 9Mar1955 and carried out a test and training flight at Auckland the following day. on the 15th it was flown to Fiji to operate the Coral Route from the 15th March to the 20th May. It was then returned to Auckland when ZK-AMO re-entered service, and was again placed in storage from 22May1955.

ZK-AMQ on take-off at Fiji. Probably originally a TEAL publicity photograph

Image

In 1956 runway problems at Nandi (Fiji) necessitated the TEAL Auckland-Fiji sector to revert to flyng boat utilization. ZK-AMO was used on this service from the beginning of August until early October. Therefore ZK-AMQ was again called back into use, carrying out test flights at Auckland on the 23rd July and 1st August before flying to Suva on the 3rd. It then operated the Coral Route from 6Aug1956 until 12Oct56 when ZK-AMO was again available.

ZK-AMQ active in the Pacific Islands

Image

ZK-AMQ flew back to Auckland on the 17th, and then operated the final TEAL Auckland-Chatham Islands-Auckland flight on 19/20Oct1956. This was ZK-AMQs final flight, and the Solent was again placed in reserve storage.
By mid-1957 it was stripped of useful equipment, and was sold for scrap on October 1957.
(Details largely thanks to Peter Layne)

The end for ZK-AMQ

Image
Last edited by flyernzl on Sun Jul 24, 2011 11:00 am, edited 3 times in total.
User avatar
flyernzl
 
Posts: 272
Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 11:05 pm

Re: Short Flying Boats in New Zealand

Postby flyernzl » Thu Apr 21, 2011 10:27 am

That covers the Short boats that were operated in civil aviation service within New Zealand.

The remainder of the ZK-AM* registrations were held for marine aircraft use. However, despite the precedent set by the amphibious Walrus ZK-AMJ, no attempt was made to register the Grumman Widgeons, Geese or Mallard within this sequence.

Eventually in 1984 the unused registrations were made available for general use. Over time they were taken up as follows:
ZK-AMR Douglas DC-3C
ZK-AMS Douglas DC-3C-S1C3G
ZK-AMT Ultralight Thruster Gemini
ZK-AMU Beech D.17S
ZK-AMV Vector Aircraft Vector 610
ZK-AMW Micro Aviation B22 Bantam
ZK-AMW/2 Aeronautical Corporation Aeronca 100
ZK-AMX Eipper Quicksilver MX II
ZK-AMY Douglas DC-3C-SIC3G
ZK-AMZ Micro Aviation B22 Bantam
None with any marine connections!

Short Singapore
I had not intended to cover the four Singapores operated by the RNZAF in Fiji here, as they never reached New Zealand.
Therefore I did not include them in my count of 31 Short aircraft operated in New Zealand.
However, details of these aircraft have been requested.

As I do not know a lot about them, Alan (sunderlandmr5) has agreed to contribute a post in this thread covering their activities.

Over to you Alan.
User avatar
flyernzl
 
Posts: 272
Joined: Sat Apr 04, 2009 11:05 pm

Re: Short Flying Boats in New Zealand

Postby AlexNortonesq » Fri Apr 22, 2011 3:18 pm

Superb series. Thank you very much. I have followed it with a keen interest, and am saddened to think that there weren't more boats so that you could have continued longer.

My hat is off to you!

Now, I hope that Alan can continue in your shoes with the Singapore series. All yours Alan!
AlexNortonesq
 
Posts: 111
Joined: Mon Mar 30, 2009 8:48 pm
Location: Toronto ON Canada

PreviousNext

Return to Shorts Flying Boats Reference Archive



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest

Help keep this forum ad-free - please Donate


This free, ad-free forum is hosted by ForumLaunch