Grumman G-73 Mallard - reproduction possible?

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Grumman G-73 Mallard - reproduction possible?

Postby NeBeSci » Fri Aug 08, 2014 12:42 pm

The Grumman G-73 Mallard, a medium, twin-engine amphibious aircraft, was built 1946 to 1951. Production ended when Grumman's larger SA-16 Albatross was introduced. Frakes Aviation holds various STC’s. From 1967 onwards they replaced the original radial engines with modern turboprop engines PT6A-34 and implemented further modifications like 17 seat interior, Collins Avionics etc. Overall 12 aircraft were modified.
Would a re-production of this aircraft be of interest to the world market? What is the forum’s feedback?

It is not the intention to lure members to other sites, however the original article is posted on Linkedin at the Forum Aircraft Owners & Pilots - so those of you being in Linkedin feel free to contribute to the discussion - thank you


originally posted in Linkedin:
Grumman G-73 Mallard - would the re-production of this aircraft be of interest?
https://www.linkedin.com/groupItem?view ... up%3A44569
NeBeSci
 
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Re: Grumman G-73 Mallard - reproduction possible?

Postby Rajay » Sun Dec 28, 2014 11:21 pm

NeBeSci wrote:The Grumman G-73 Mallard, a medium, twin-engine amphibious aircraft, was built 1946 to 1951. Production ended when Grumman's larger SA-16 Albatross was introduced. Frakes Aviation holds various STC’s....

Couple of common misconceptions there. The Mallard did not pre-date the larger Albatross in terms of design, it simply beat it to full-scale production and its own intended market. Vagaries of military procurement and Congressional budgets versus or compared to the private sector.

Of course, with so many more built and for more customers, the Albatross remained in production much longer, up until 1961 - not including the much later G-111 conversions project. While there were only 59 Mallards built, there were 466 Albatrosses built including the two XJ2RF-1 pre-production prototypes and the 464 production models. Big difference....

However, as you will recall, the Albatross was originally Grumman design no. G-64 and the Mallard is the G-73, so the design of the Albatross actually came first. Also, their target audiences or markets were always completely different - the Albatross was always intended as a military aircraft and the Mallard always as a civil or corporate aircraft.

Also, Frakes holds not only various STCs pertaining to the G-73 series, including the PT6A turbine conversion (STC SA2323WE) and the 17-seat "commuter" interior upgrade (up from the original 10 seat configuration - which BTW included the pilots; i.e. STC SA4410SW) they also currently - and for the past 30+ years or so for that matter too - have owned the actual former/original Grumman type certificates for the G-21A Goose (ATC-654), the G-44 Widgeon (A-734), and the G-73 Mallard (A-783) as well.

But sure, it'd be "possible" to put it back into production. There's probably even a limited market for it, but don't hold your breath - the obstacles are huge and the odds are long!
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