From the beginning, starting with c/n 1201 - McKinnon style!

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Re: From the beginning, starting with c/n 1201 - McKinnon st

Postby Kenny » Tue Aug 06, 2013 11:48 pm

Keep it coming... ;)
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From the beginning, starting with c/n 1201 - McKinnon style!

Postby Rajay » Wed Aug 07, 2013 5:17 pm

McKinnon serial no. 1205 – Part II

After being re-certified as a 1969 model McKinnon G-21G, serial no. 1205, N5558 was retained by McKinnon essentially as a factory demonstrator. However, after just two more turbine Goose conversions, one model G-21G in March 1970 and lastly a model G-21E in May 1970, no more projects or customers were forthcoming.

From the chattel mortgage records pertaining to N5558 that were obtained from the FAA archives in Oklahoma City, OK it appears that McKinnon stopped making payments to the First National Bank of Oregon on or about May 25, 1970 for the loans he had gotten in 1968 in the amount of $200,000.00 (at 7.5% APR) to cover the costs of the conversion of this and maybe other aircraft, too. In addition to the aircraft in question, McKinnon also appears to have used all of his “tools, instruments, equipment, parts, appliances, accessories, and other apparatus and attachments then or thereafter attached thereto or to become a component part thereof” as additional collateral for the loan – in other words, he was “all in” on this deal.

During February and March of 1969, McKinnon had borrowed another $150,000.00 (at 5.0% APR) against N5558 in the form of a second mortgage from an individual named James Eklem of Portland, OR. Apparently, McKinnon also stopped making interest payments on that loan also on or about May 25, 1970, but the principal technically was not due until the aircraft was sold. On March 22, 1971, Mr. Eklem signed over his note against N5558 to the United States National Bank of Oregon.

In addition to the financing that he had received from the First National Bank of Oregon and from Mr. Eklem, McKinnon had also received financial considerations from Pratt & Whitney of Canada Ltd. (PWC) regarding the two PT6A-27 turbine engines that were installed on N5558. Pursuant to a letter agreement dated November 22, 1968, PWC delivered two such engines, valued at $74,930.00 USD, to McKinnon on December 7, 1968. Payment for these engines also was to be made as soon as the aircraft or the engines were sold.

Between April 20, 1971 and December 28, 1971, the matter was heard by the Circuit Court for the State of Oregon in the County of Multnomah (the city of Portland) and the court ruled against defendant McKinnon Enterprises Inc. and in favor of the plaintiff, the First National Bank of Oregon. On January 17, 1972, the Sheriff of Clakamas County, OR (in which McKinnon’s “factory” near the town of Sandy was located) conducted a publicly advertised auction for all of McKinnon’s assets. In the absence of any competing bids, the First National Bank of Oregon took over all of McKinnon’s assets for the paltry sum of $10,000.00 – probably the minimum bid allowed by law.

On January 28, 1972, the registration for N5558 was officially transferred to the First National Bank of Oregon and on November 7, 1972, the bank sold it to Peyton Hawes of Portland, OR. Mr. Hawes was the founder and owner of the Payless Drug Stores chain and later, at least for a while, he also owned N150M, McKinnon G-21D serial no. 1251.

In December 1980, Hawes sold N5558 to Sea Bee Air Ltd. of Auckland, New Zealand and it was re-registered as ZK-ERX. Murray Pope, one of the co-founders and General Manager of Sea Bee Air, told me that when they ferried it across the Pacific, they carried so much auxiliary fuel in the cabin (on top of the 586 US gallons that were already carried in the wings) that the airplane that was certified and approved to operate up to 12,500 lbs. actually grossed out at over 21,000 lbs according to his calculations and that it just about wore out a brand new set of tires on the very first take-off from California for the first leg to Hawaii.

Note: at 6.7 lbs./gallon, that extra 8,500 lbs. of gross weight would translate to almost 1,270 gallons of Jet-A fuel. With a basic empty weight in the vicinity of 7,000 lbs. and 586 gallons of standard fuel equaling 3,926 lbs. plus a crew of 2 people (realistically 400 lbs?) and setting aside another 100 lbs for misc. gear and survival equipment, there still could have been another 1,074 lbs. of fuel or another 160 US gallons on top of everything else – that’s a total of over 2,000 gallons of fuel and at a fuel burn of only 90 gal/hour in cruise, it could have gone for almost 22.5 hours!

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Once in New Zealand, Sea Bee Air primarily used ZK-ERX for government subsidized charter work in the islands of Tuvalu.

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By the middle of 1984, ZK-ERX was sorely in need of some TLC after operating for several years in a warm, salt-water environment and it was sent to the Air New Zealand maintenance facility for a major airframe overhaul. It was such a rare and unusual aircraft that it became the pet project of most of the mechanics there and almost all of them clamored for an opportunity to fly on it after their work was done.

In December 1984, Sea Bee Air Ltd. sold it to Aero Quest Inc. of North Ridgeville, OH for $400,000.00 USD (plus the costs of ferrying it from New Zealand to Cleveland, OH less the cost of any repairs necessary to qualify it for a new FAA certificate of airworthiness once it got there.) It was shipped back to the west coast of the US, flown to Ohio, and re-registered as N77AQ. On the FAA Form 8130-6Application for Airworthiness Certificate” it was noted that the aircraft had 2,598.4 hours TIS at that time and the new Standard CoA was issued on December 21, 1984.

One of the first things that Aero Quest did with N77AQ was install a custom, very large cargo door on the right side of the aft fuselage in July 1985.

On February 11, 1987, the registration of N77AQ was transferred to Aero Quest’s parent company, Kalt Manufacturing Co., because of a merger of the corporate entities.

On June 6, 1990, Kalt Mfg. sold N77AQ to Dan Vollum of Aero Air, LLC of Hillsboro, OR. In April 1991, Vollum also had the large cargo door on the right side modified from a 2-piece setup into a 3-piece arrangement whereby the bottom 8 inches could be left closed to maintain the freeboard of the aircraft in the water.

The sales literature produced by Aero Air almost a year later (in July 1991) listed its total time in service (TIS) as only 2,830 hours since “new” – i.e. since its conversion and re-certification by McKinnon in 1969. In spite of making the effort to produce that sales literature, Dan Vollum has yet to sell N77AQ and continues to operate it for personal pleasure and other adventures after more than 20 years of ownership. He has used it in support of a seal research project in the Aleutians and almost annually takes it across the United States from Oregon to the Bahamas, often varying his route and exploring different parts of the country along the way.

It obviously continues to prove that it is the perfect aircraft for such adventures....
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From the beginning, starting with c/n 1201 - McKinnon style!

Postby Rajay » Thu Aug 08, 2013 5:36 pm

McKinnon serial no. 1226

N70AL


1945 Grumman JRF-5 s/n B-125 was built in April 1945 for the US Navy as Bu. no. 87731. On July 1, 1954, the Japanese Maritime Self-Defense Force (JMSDF) was formed and among the very first aircraft that went into service with it were four surplus US Navy model JRF-5 Gooses – including Bu. no. 87731, which was coded by the JMSDF as no. 9013. It was eventually withdrawn from service in the early 1960’s; Ginter says “about 1960” but its sister ship, ex-JMSDF no. 9012 (Grumman G-21A s/n 1188 which was later taken over by the Navy during the war and initially brought up to JRF-4 standards) was purchased from the US Army Depot Command in Japan by Tom Danaher of Wichita Falls, TX in 1963 and registered back in the US as N291VW on April 14, 1964.

On September 19, 1968, Tom Danaher returned to Japan and bought a second surplus ex-JMSDF and ex-US Navy model JRF-5 Goose from the US Army Depot Command; this time around it was Bu. no. 87731. For it, he paid the sum of$5,555.56 and then he had it shipped back to the US. About a year later, on August 18, 1969, Danaher turned around and sold it to McKinnon Enterprises Inc. for $15,000.00. The Bill of Sale from Tom Danaher to McKinnon Enterprises Inc. still formally identified it as “Grumman JRF-5 Bureau no. 87731.”

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About that same time, on August 28, 1969, McKinnon signed a chattel mortgage against “McKinnon G-21G s/n 1226” in the amount of $75,000.00 (at 8.5% APR) from Total Aviation Support Ltd. of Vancouver, BC, Canada, presumably to cover the costs of its upcoming conversion.

Even prior to its actual conversion, McKinnon wrote several times to the FAA Aircraft Registration Branch to request a particular N-number for the aircraft. A handwritten note dated Sept. 2, 1969 inquired about the availability of either N3060A or N1970A and then a formal FAA Form 8050-1 dated August 21, 1969 (but apparently not received and processed until Sept. 4, 1969) was submitted for the not-yet-built “McKinnon G-21G s/n 1226” first in regard to the use of N60AL and then apparently it was later changed to N70AL. A subsequent Form 8050-1 was submitted on October 23, 1969 on which only the N70AL registration number was noted.

The records also include a copy of an FAA Form 8050-64Reservation of Special Registration Marks” which although itself undated notes that the assigned but not taken up registration of N60AL was supplanted by N70AL, which was actually placed on the aircraft on ?-13-70 (the full date is obscured by what appears to be a hole punched in the document. Note that the conversion of the aircraft was completed in March 1970, the FAA Form 337Major Repair and Alteration” for its conversion was dated March 18, 1970, the FAA Form 317Statement of Conformity” was dated March 16, 1970, and the actual FAA Form 8100-2Standard Airworthiness Certificate” was also dated March 16, 1970. In any case, it seems evident that no registration marks other than N70AL were officially placed on the completed aircraft, at the time of its conversion or at any time since.

As soon as it was officially completed on March 18, 1970, the new Turbo Goose “1970 McKinnon G-21G s/n 1226”, registered as N70AL, was sold to U. S. Plywood – Champion Papers Inc. of Juneau, AK with only 1.7 hours of Time in Service on the clock.

On June 14, 1972, the registration was changed to reflect corresponding changes in the corporate owner and the name was changed to the Champion International Corporation of 777 Third Avenue, New York City, NY 10017.

On January 2, 1974, N70AL was sold to the Chevron Oil Company, California Division, of New Orleans, LA and in 1983 the registration was revised to once again reflect changes in the corporate owner, which by that time had become Chevron USA Inc.

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On February 14, 1992, it was sold and re-registered to Northern Air Inc. of Reno, NV, which seems to have been just a shell company and/or tax shelter for Dr. Reginald H. Slade of the Redbird Minor Emergency Center, 4323 S. Hampton Road, Dallas, TX 75232

On May 20, 1999, Dr. Slade sold N70AL to Dan Vollum of Aero Planes LLC of Hillsboro, OR – and of course by that time, Dan already also owned the only other model G-21G ever built and certified as such actually by McKinnon Enterprises Inc. – i.e. 1969 McKinnon G-21G s/n 1205, N77AQ.

On March 22, 2004, Dan Vollum sold it to its current owner, Bob Redner of West Bloomfield, MI, dba Killa Katchka Inc.

Image
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From the beginning, starting with c/n 1201 - McKinnon style!

Postby Rajay » Thu Aug 08, 2013 11:19 pm

McKinnon serial no. 1211 - the very last one ever built actually by McKinnon...

N121H

Grumman G-21A
s/n 1013 (the very first production model “G-21A” ever built) was completed in May 1938. It was initially registered as CF-BKE in Canada to Mr. John P. Bickell of Toronto, the owner of the McIntyre-Porcupine Mines.

On Sept. 12, 1939, less than two weeks after the Nazi invasion of Poland, CF-BKE was donated by its private owner to the RCAF for use in the upcoming war effort and became Goose Mk. II RCAF serial no. 924.

According to this Web site (http://www.rwrwalker.ca/RCAF_901_950_detailed.htm) Goose serial no. 924 was assigned to:
No. 13 (OT) Squadron, RCAF Station Patricia Bay, BC, Nov. 1940 to Jan. 1942. Coded "MK-G".
No. 122 (K) Squadron, RCAF Station Patricia Bay, BC, Jan. 1942 and Aug. 1943 (same code?).
Still carried this code in Sept. 1943, while with the Photographic Flight, RCAF Station Rockcliffe, Ont.
No. 167 (Comm) Squadron, RCAF Station Dartmouth, NS, Aug. 1943 to Sept. 1945.
Even though the dates seem to conflict, it has also been noted to have supposedly served with No. 120 (BR) Squadron from RCAF Station Coal Harbour, BC, Nov. 1941 – Oct. 1943.

It was then supposedly Struck off Charge (SOC) Jan. 1, 1945 and sold as surplus (but that is another date conflict - so how did it continue to serve with No. 167 Squadron at RCAF Dartmouth, NS until Sept. 1945?)

Apparently, it actually did not continue to serve with any RCAF squadron until Sept. 1945 because according to records from the FAA Aircraft Registration Branch archives in Oklahoma City, OK, the Canadian War Assets Corporation in Montreal, Quebec sold Grumman G-21A serial no. 1013 on January 22, 1945 to Charles H. Babb & Co. of 444 Madison Ave. New York City, NY 10022 for the sum of $10.00and other valuable considerations.”

On Feb. 1, 1945, Mr. Edward Lund, manager of Charles H. Babb Company, submitted an application for a new US civil aircraft registration for Grumman G-21A serial no. 1013 and on Feb, 26, 1945, a certificate of registration as NC18175 was issued by the Civil Aeronautics Administration of the US Dept. of Commerce.

The Charles H. Babb Co. was just an aircraft broker and never actually took possession of the aircraft in question and it had remained in Canada the whole time from Jan. until July 1945. On July 21, 1945, the Canada Dept. of Transport issued authorization to conduct a ferry flight from Cartierville Airport to Montreal Airport and “thence to the Canadian border” for the purpose of delivery of the aircraft to Albany, NY via Burlington, VT.

On July 24, 1945, the Charles H. Babb Co. sold NC18175 to Mr. James C. Marchant of Roslyn, Long Island, NY and a new formal certificate of registration was finally issued in his name on Sept. 26, 1945.

On May 15, 1952, Mr. Marchant sold NC18175 to the Western Newspaper Union of 317 East 45th Street, New York City, NY 10017 (FYI: WNU is not the same thing as Western Union)

On June 2, 1954, the Western Newspaper Union sold it the Halliburton Oil Well Cementing Company of Duncan, OK and it was re-registered as N121H. On Aug. 8, 1960, the registration was amended to reflect a change in the name of the owner to just the Halliburton Company.

Sometime between April 1957 and August 1959, Halliburton moved its primary base of operations for N121H from Tulsa, OK to Lakefront Airport in New Orleans.

In early 1970, Halliburton sent N121H to McKinnon Enterprises Inc. for conversion into a “new” model G-21E aircraft in accordance with Master Drawing List (MDL) MPD-90996 and it was equipped with the “optional” 680 shp PT6A-27 turbine engines. In addition to the alterations in conjunction with its formal type conversion, McKinnon also documented several major repairs on an FAA Form 337Major Repair and Alteration” dated Apr. 24, 1970 and it was followed up with an FAA Form 8130-6Application for Airworthiness Certificate” dated May 5, 1970, noting only 8.25 hours TIS (flight test)

Image
Note the absence of the tunnel vent modifiaction and the fact that the main cabin windows are still "stock" - the McKinnon
"picture widow" mod also was not installed for whatever reason. Also, the leading edge landing lights (shown here) were not
installed until much later.

On November 22, 1991, after more than 37 years of continuous service with Halliburton, N121H was sold to American Aviation Inc. of Brooksville, FL. The Bill of Sale was signed by Mr. S. M. Adkinson, Sr. VP and Administrative Controller of Halliburton.

On November 25, 1992, it was re-sold to Air Power Ltd. of Hillsboro, OR. The Bill of Sale was signed by Sheila Sweeny, VP of American Aviation Inc. (it kinda seems that all of the McKinnon Gooses were coming “home to roost” in the Portland area around that time, doesn’t it?) Then, a change of address for Air Power Ltd. to a new location in Medford, OR was submitted to the FAA on March 9, 1993.
Last edited by Rajay on Thu Sep 19, 2013 5:43 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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From the beginning, starting with c/n 1201 - McKinnon style!

Postby Rajay » Thu Aug 08, 2013 11:43 pm

McKinnon serial no. 1211 – part II

On July 1, 1994, N121H was sold to Stallion Aircraft Inc. of Bensenville, IL near Chicago. The Bill of Sale this time around was signed by Irvin S. Lewandowski, VP of Air Power Ltd.

Inexplicably, the loan contract by which Stallion Aircraft Inc. financed the purchase of N121H identified it as a “1944 Grumman Goose, Model #G21E” and that wasn’t true or accurate either before or after its conversion by McKinnon in 1970.

Note: There were also several FAA Forms 337 documenting various repairs and alterations over the course of the twenty or so years after its conversion by McKinnon on which it was also mistakenly identified as either a “Grumman” or a McKinnon model “G-21G” – its enough to make you (it made me) wonder why all of those various “certified” mechanics and/or IA’s (the “Inspection Authorization” guys who “approved” the Forms 337) had so much trouble simply reading the official McKinnon data tag under the leading edge of its left horizontal stabilizer or its official FAA certificates of registration and airworthiness that were presumably displayed either in the cockpit or the main cabin.

It turns out that Irv Lewandowski of Air Power Ltd. and Jack Rodgers of Stallion Aircraft Inc. were actually very close friends and partners in and co-founders of the Air Classics Inc. aviation museum that was at that time located at the DuPage Airport west of Chicago. After buying N121H, they supposedly put it into a year-long restoration, but on November 1994, Irv Lewandowski had a heart attack and died while flying on a commercial airline flight to Anchorage, AK on Sunday, November 6, 1994 while on a trip to scout other old military aircraft for the museum. He was only 46 years old.

Image

On June 13, 1995, just 8 months after the death of Irv Lewandowski, Jack Rodgers and Bob Knoll, an aircraft mechanic and another co-founder of the Air Classics Inc. museum, were test flying N121H at the DuPage shortly after fresh engines had been reinstalled on the aircraft.* They were making closed circuits of the airport traffic patterns and practicing take-offs and landings on Runway 28. On the third take-off or “go-around” the pilot apparently failed to fully retract the flaps prior to rotation. Witnesses stated that it had a ground roll of about 700 feet and then climbed to only 60 feet. With half flaps (30 degrees) the lightly-loaded aircraft pitched up sharply, stalled, and veered to the left, almost rolled over and then impacted the ground.

*As he openly acknowledged over the radio to ATC at DuPage (according to the communications transcripts pertaining to the accident) Jack Rodgers was not “current” in the aircraft, so that begs the question – why was he carrying a passenger? The Goose was rated for a single pilot and no other flightcrew members were “required.”

The aircraft impacted the ground about 1,900 feet from the departure end of runway 28 and 235 feet to the left edge of runway 28. The aircraft was resting flat heading about 065 degrees magnetic. Air Traffic Controllers from the FAA tower stated the aircraft struck the ground going almost nose straight down and caught fire. After burning for an undetermined period, the aircraft settled down on the underside. The entire aircraft was consumed in the post crash fire except the empennage.

Both Jack Rodgers and Bob Knoll were killed – hopefully instantly. They were only 53 and 52 years old respectively.

Image

The Air Classics Inc. museum Web site: http://www.airclassicsmuseum.org/

The NTSB accident summary: http://www.ntsb.gov/ntsb/brief.asp?ev_i ... 3645&key=1

A Chicago Tribune newspaper article about the crash:
http://articles.chicagotribune.com/1995-06-15/news/9506150164_1_plane-crash-takeoffs-and-landings-airport-spokesman
Last edited by Rajay on Mon Aug 19, 2013 3:07 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: From the beginning, starting with c/n 1201 - McKinnon st

Postby Kenny » Sat Aug 10, 2013 11:06 am

What a sad end to the story...
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Re: From the beginning, starting with c/n 1201 - McKinnon st

Postby Rajay » Tue Aug 13, 2013 7:41 pm

Obviously, McKinnon played a little bit fast and loose with the whole idea of serial numbers that were actually sequential. Strictly in accordance with FAA regulations, he probably shouldn’t have used the ones that he did, because they appear to be a continuation of legacy Grumman serial numbers for the first half (or so) of Grumman’s own G-21series production.

Under ATC-654, Grumman produced the first 200 out of an eventual total of 345 G-21 series “Goose” aircraft as serial numbers 1001 through 1200. McKinnon started off his production with serial number 1201. The second half of Grumman’s G-21 series production was distinguished by their “B” series serial numbers: B-1 through B-145.

Legacy editions of FAA Type Certificate no. 4A24 imply that more “McKinnon” aircraft were produced than actually were because Angus McKinnon defined and reserved blocks of "eligible serial numbers" for each type or model covered by the TC apparently on the basis of what he planned to “build” eventually – instead of listing only the specific aircraft that he actually “built” or converted from legacy Grumman airframes. (I can’t recall ever seeing another aircraft type or FAA type certificate in which that was true; AFAIK all of the rest of them list only the ranges of serial numbers for aircraft actually “built” or produced.)

Currently, TC 4A24 lists the following "eligible serial numbers" for each type:

Section I Model G-21C Serial nos.: 1202, 1204 (= 2 serial nos.)
Section II Model G-21D Serial nos.: 1251 through 1255 (= 5 serial nos.)
Section III Model G-21E Serial nos.: 1211 through 1225 (= 15 serial nos.)
Section IV Model G-21G Serial nos.: 1201, 1203, 1205, 1226 through 1250 (= 28 serial nos.)
The apparent total based on “eligible” serial numbers = as many as 50 aircraft

In reality, based on what was actually or even just nominally "built" by McKinnon (and as what), the list should be:

Section I Model G-21C Serial nos.: 1201*, 1202 (= 2 aircraft)
Section II Model G-21D Serial nos.: 1251* (= 1 aircraft)
Section III Model G-21E Serial nos.: 1203**, 1204**, 1211 (= 3 aircraft)
Section IV Model G-21G Serial nos.: 1205, 1226 (= 2 aircraft)
Actual total (counting N150M only once) = just 7 aircraft.

Notes:
*Since G-21C serial no. 1201 was later converted into G-21D serial no. 1251, I don’t count them separately as two airframes – they were one and the same: N150M.

**Although serial nos. 1203 and 1204 were converted and re-certified by McKinnon only nominally as models "G-21C" (i.e. "Hybrid" twin-turboprop conversions of a model G-21C per STC SA1320WE) they would have been more accurately identified and properly certified as models G-21E at the time of their official re-certification in July 1968 – in spite of the fact that the model G-21E was not approved and certified under TC 4A24 Section III until July 1969.

In any case, on the basis of this data, it can be seen that various claims that McKinnon built at least 10 and as many as a couple of dozen Goose conversions under TC 4A24 are just not true. Accounting for the fact that some airframes were converted and re-certified as something else more than once, it becomes clear that there were only seven (7) unique airframes officially re-certified under TC 4A24 actually by McKinnon.
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