What is a Duck - a floatplane or a "flyingboat"?

The source for references and discussion on all types & marques of this Grumman amphibian: photos, plans, manual pages & documents.

What is a Duck - a floatplane or a "flyingboat"?

Postby Rajay » Fri Aug 08, 2014 6:25 pm

I personally think a case could be made either way - just curious to hear what everyone else thinks...

Floatplane (Curtiss Seagull):
Image

Flyingboat (Republic Seabee):
Image

What? Something in-between (Grumman Duck):
Image
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Re: What is a Duck - a floatplane or a "flyingboat"?

Postby WhyMe » Fri Aug 08, 2014 6:33 pm

IMHO even though it's a single hull, the separate "fuselage" and "float" are clearly defined, hence it's a floatplane :roll:

Here's a more interesting case: Great Lakes XSG
Image

Is it a floatplane with a tail on the float? Or is it a flying boat with a cockpit inside the engine nacelle? :mrgreen:
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Re: What is a Duck - a floatplane or a "flyingboat"?

Postby MrWidgeon » Sat Aug 09, 2014 1:55 am

The Duck is (was ?) a flying boat.
It cannot be operated without the lower hull section, nor was it ever intended to be operated in that manner.
The separate hull and fuselage sections were done strictly for manufacturing reasons.

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Re: What is a Duck - a floatplane or a "flyingboat"?

Postby MrWidgeon » Sat Aug 09, 2014 1:58 am

The same thing applies regarding the Great Lakes XSG.
It cannot be operated as a landplane, hence it's a flying boat.

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Re: What is a Duck - a floatplane or a "flyingboat"?

Postby WhyMe » Tue Aug 12, 2014 8:33 pm

Thanks for the explanation, MrWidgeon.

As far as I understand your logic, if an aircraft can be operated without floats then it's a floatplane, otherwise a flying boat.
I'm not trying to argue, but here's another interesting case: Shavrov Sh-5.
Image

Clearly a flying boat, isn't it? Yet it can be operated without floats and the lower part of the "boat" hull:
Image

Does it make it a floatplane then? :?
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Re: What is a Duck - a floatplane or a "flyingboat"?

Postby MrWidgeon » Thu Aug 14, 2014 9:13 am

I was afraid someone would bring that one up.
I don't know how to classify that thing other than to say it was originally built as an amphibious flying boat with a removable hull.
It could be operated as a landplane and was tested as such until it broke a landing gear strut and the project was abandoned.

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