Bristol Jupiter

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Bristol Jupiter

Postby Stealer » Wed Oct 20, 2010 12:09 am

Here are three great photos opf the famous Bristol Jupiter. This 2-valve , air cooled, 9 cylinder radial is the predecessor to the Bristol Pegasus. You can clearly see the valve pushrods behind each other, whereas they are both covered on the Pegasus. The Bristol Jupiter were the original engines on the Dornier Do-X and powered many other famous 'boats as well:

Image

Image

Image
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Re: Bristol Jupiter

Postby maxmwill » Sat Sep 22, 2012 9:00 pm

I appreciate you posting these pics, as I'd been wondering if I could ever find a clear enough pic of the Jupiter which would show the placement of the ignition wires, not only on the jugs, but also where the wire harness is on the case. And not only that, but also the exhaust collector, as well as just what the colors of the engine are.

While what I've been trying to build is neither a flying boat nor a seaplane, there are other aircraft which are either of both, which also used the Jupiter.

Currently, I've in the works a conversion of a 1/48 scale Brisfit to a Bristol Jupiter Fighter.

But, these pics would be useful when building other models.
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Re: Bristol Jupiter

Postby seawings » Sun Sep 23, 2012 6:52 pm

Look in the Engine section of the main SEAWINGS site; there is a walk-round of a Jupiter that I took there, if that helps.........
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Re: Bristol Jupiter

Postby maxmwill » Sun Sep 23, 2012 7:20 pm

I've been trying to get onto the home page from the forums, and have had no luck, so I can't look in the engine section, although I'll try something else. There is no icon in the forums main page which could direct someone to the site home page, at least I can't find one.
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Re: Bristol Jupiter

Postby seawings » Sun Sep 23, 2012 7:51 pm

maxmwill wrote:I've been trying to get onto the home page from the forums, and have had no luck, so I can't look in the engine section, although I'll try something else. There is no icon in the forums main page which could direct someone to the site home page, at least I can't find one.


Just go to: www.seawings.co.uk

There is no direct link for the forum to the website as they are two completely separate entities.
Best Regards,

Bryan Ribbans
Owner of:

The Flying Boat Forum
SEAWINGS - The Website

"I put the sweat of my life into this project, and if it's a failure, I'll leave the country and never come back".
Howard Hughes, re: the HK-1 Hughes Flying Boat, aka the 'Spruce Goose,' 1946.
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Re: Bristol Jupiter

Postby maxmwill » Sun Sep 23, 2012 9:45 pm

Got it.

And the pics of the Jupiter have helped answer a few more questions as to the placement of the ignition wires. Interestingly, I never knew of individual wires inside individual sheaths, and copper sheaths at that. I wonder why the engineers designed it that way. The only thing I could think of is that they wanted to provide a ground of some sort, although that wouldn't make much sense.

Something that is missing from that is the collector ring, or intake manifold. But, perhaps if I give a closer look at what I already have, perhaps I could make that out.

Something that strikes me about the Jupiter, however, is that pair of center strut/rods which are bewteen each pair of push rods on each cylinder. This marks the engine apart from all other radials designed, whether they be from Great Britain or other countries.

I realize that there might be some details I can't model, simply because I could "lock myself up" with regard to taking too much to chew on, but knowing about little details, such as the placement of the ignition wires, does help with understand the engine and its design a lot better.

But, thise desire to attend to such attention stems from the first kit I bought recently, since my wife began encouraging me to get into a hobby or hobbies of my choice.


It was a Roden Sopwith 1 1/2 Strutter, and the push rods for the engine were pe brass. These looked, to me, quite off, because I worked on a full size Le Rhone, on a Tommy Morse, a restored antique, and those push rods were most definitely not flat., so some parts of the kit kinda bothered me in that regard. Mostly because in an aircraft that has a radial engine, the whole front of the engine is exposed for all the world to see, and flat pushrods just won't "cut it" for me. Unless, of course, one is building a model of a Japanese or German aircraft which had radials, because those are usually not very exposed, so one can "fudge" a bit on the model.
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Re: Bristol Jupiter

Postby dogsbody » Sun Sep 23, 2012 10:30 pm

Is there a particular exhaust arrangement that you are looking for? I've just looked through my copy of Alec Lumsden's book " British Piston Aero-engines and Their Aircraft " and there are various exhaust configurations, depending on the installation and when it was used.


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with a uniform to wear,
a fast aeroplane to fly,
and something to shoot at?"
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Re: Bristol Jupiter

Postby maxmwill » Sun Sep 23, 2012 11:44 pm

Not the exhaust, but the intake; what comes from the carburettor. The photos I've seen with the intake manifold installed were taken of the engines on the aircraft, and from a relative distance, and the quality of the photography isn't all that great to begin with.

And on those photos, I've also noticed something of a range, but just on the aircraft with the engines fully exposed, as on some aircraft, there appears to be some sort of sheet metal cover, usually with slots of some sort, and sometimes those are more of a teardrop shape.
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Re: Bristol Jupiter

Postby seamaster » Mon Sep 24, 2012 1:26 pm

I am no engine expert but the second photo show the intake manifold with the carburator at the bottom and the individual pipes leading to the top of the cylinder heads.

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Re: Bristol Jupiter

Postby dogsbody » Mon Sep 24, 2012 3:31 pm

Image


Chris
Last edited by dogsbody on Thu Sep 07, 2017 2:11 am, edited 1 time in total.
Reason: Photobucket can suck it!
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with a uniform to wear,
a fast aeroplane to fly,
and something to shoot at?"
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