Bristol Jupiter

Information requests specifically on flying boat engines. This is the place to post photos, plans and documents to form an historical archive.

Re: Bristol Jupiter

Postby seamaster » Mon Sep 24, 2012 5:08 pm

Chris, I bet you were excellent with Crayons in school!

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Re: Bristol Jupiter

Postby seamaster » Mon Sep 24, 2012 5:09 pm

Chris, I bet you were excellent with Crayons in school!

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Re: Bristol Jupiter

Postby dogsbody » Mon Sep 24, 2012 6:57 pm

You bet. Could keep it inside the lines, most of the time.

Now days, I'm mostly outside the lines!



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"What young man could possibly be bored
with a uniform to wear,
a fast aeroplane to fly,
and something to shoot at?"
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Re: Bristol Jupiter

Postby maxmwill » Mon Sep 24, 2012 7:25 pm

I was very mistaken, because you are right. The intake manifold is in the after part of the engine, so the exhaust manifold is in the forward part of the engine.

I'm so used to working on Shaky Jakes, Pratts, Curtisses, and even a Le Rhone(which, incidentally has a really funkydelic way of getting fuel from the carburetter to the cylinders.The first time I looked at the maintence manual, my first thought was that the engineer who designed the fuel induction for that engine had some good drugs to consume, but after I jumped in and started working on it, the design started to make sense), and those all had the exhaust collector in the after part of the engines.

So I ASSumed that this engine would be designed the same way. So much for my allegedly "magnificent" powers of observation. It also shows that I still have a lot to learn.

Something I learned the hard way was to never hold onto one of the ignition wires on a Le Rhone and start to spin the engine by hand. The ignition wires are uninsulated #22 copper bell wire and the magneto can catch really easily, especially if it has the original mag switch(sometimes it sticks closed),and the mag can really bite, and bite hard.
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Re: Bristol Jupiter

Postby dogsbody » Mon Sep 24, 2012 8:36 pm

I think most, if not all, Bristol radial engines exhausted toward the front. With the introduction of Townend rings and then NACA cowlings, the exhaust collector ring was incorporated into the leading edge.



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with a uniform to wear,
a fast aeroplane to fly,
and something to shoot at?"
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Re: Bristol Jupiter

Postby maxmwill » Mon Sep 24, 2012 9:03 pm

O, ok.

It's little things like that that one has to learn on one's own, because stuff like that is rarely recorded, unless one knows exactly where to look.

It's like the Le Rhone that was on a Tommy Morse I helped work on. Something you never read about is the fact that one the end of each cylinder, the cylinders that were original with the rest of the engine, there is a tiny fylflot(swastika) stamped into the metal. This was not for political reasons(those didn't come into play until a few years after the war ended), but for good luck, because the fylflot s a symbol for good luck and long life(it was the Nazis who perverted its meaning), and harkens back to the pagan past of Europe. I think that it is an anncient Indo-european symbol the can be traced back to the Indus Valley, although it crops up in other, more distant cultures, such as a few Asian and Native American societies.
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