Vickers competitor for the Do-X?

From the Singapore and Southampton through to the Short Empire

Re: Vickers competitor for the Do-X?

Postby longshot » Fri Jul 10, 2020 5:35 pm

So were these Saro, Short Bros. and Blackburn projects responses to a Ministry requirement for a TransOceanic/Transatlantic capable transport flying boat?
longshot
 
Posts: 190
Joined: Sun Jul 29, 2012 12:14 am

Re: Vickers competitor for the Do-X?

Postby schneiderman » Tue Jul 14, 2020 7:32 am

20/28 was for a flying boat serving stage lengths of around 1000 miles, still some way to go before commercially viable transatlantic range was considered. Not sure how many official tenders were received, certainly Supermarine and Blackburn.
schneiderman
 
Posts: 239
Joined: Sat Jul 24, 2010 8:34 pm
Location: UK, down south

Re: Vickers competitor for the Do-X?

Postby longshot » Tue Jul 14, 2020 2:56 pm

Ah, that's interesting, so not really aimed at the Atlantic. I'm puzzled that, much later, nobody thought of fitting MAIA with extra tanks and testing it as a transatlantic version of the 'Empire' design....that larger wing !...the composite Mercury/Maia system was never really practical.
longshot
 
Posts: 190
Joined: Sun Jul 29, 2012 12:14 am

Re: Vickers competitor for the Do-X?

Postby schneiderman » Wed Jul 15, 2020 11:26 am

By the time Maia became available on completion of the Composite test programme (early 1939) the standard 'C' class were well advanced with the flight refuelling tests and the 'G' class were nearing completion, I doubt extra work with Maia would have proven much.

The Mayo Composite, funded as a mailplane, was never really intended for that purpose, as far as I can see. 'Mailplane' had been used on many occasions by the Air Ministry as a convenient tag to attach to a wide variety of experimental concepts, for example the Fairey Long Distance Monoplane. From what I have read in the Mayo archives the system was always perceived as having more value for military use. Born when the Geneva Disarmament Conference was getting underway, and where Britain had proposed a 3 ton limit on the unladen weight of bombers, this was seen as one possible solution to be able to lift a heavy bomb load and/or get increased range. Testing of flight refuelling and assisted take-off catapults by the RAE at this time were also aimed at the same goal (there was a 'Mailplane' catapult flying boat project assigned to Short for the S.29, but that was cancelled). Using Imperial Airways as a 'cover' probably seemed sensible, the company was quite dependant on government subsidies so in no position to object.

Tony Buttler's updated British Secret Projects: Bombers 1935 - 1950, due to be published at the end of this month, has a new chapter discussing Composite projects, a large part provided by me.
schneiderman
 
Posts: 239
Joined: Sat Jul 24, 2010 8:34 pm
Location: UK, down south

Previous

Return to Between the Wars - The 'Golden' Era - 1918 to 1939



Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

Help keep this forum ad-free - please Donate


This free, ad-free forum is hosted by ForumLaunch