Short Floatplanes

From Curtiss through to the Felixstowe 'boats

Short Floatplanes

Postby AquilaAudax » Thu Apr 12, 2018 9:56 am

Short Type 310-A.jpg
Short Type 310-A.jpg (197.39 KiB) Viewed 840 times
Hello Seawings

I need help to clarify the identification of a floatplane, in the attached photo, which was produced by Shorts.

The caption of Short '320' is used in J. M. Bruce's book British Aeroplanes 1914-1918 (Funk & Wagnalls, 1957). He notes that in this instance that '320' is the power rating of the Sunbeam Cossack engine installed rather than a manufacturer's type number.

He has an entry for the 'Short 310 hp Seaplane, Type B' and notes that it was 'A contemporary.. of the torpedo-carrying seaplane that became known as the Short 320'.

The caption of Short '310-A' is used in C.H. Barnes' book Shorts Aircraft since 1900 (Putnam, 1967 [rev 1989]) with no mention (that I can see) of a model '320'.

Owen Thetford lists a type designation of 'Short 320 Seaplane', in British Naval Aircraft 1912-58 (Putnam, 1958), and also notes that the '320' is the power rating of the engine installed rather than a type number. The caption for the accompanying illustration confusingly uses the terminology 'Short Type 320' (?). He notes that the 'original version [of the Short 320] had a 310 hp Cossack engine but does not mention a specific model designated '310'.

Any assistance will be gratefully appreciated.

Cheers,

Aquila Audax
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Re: Short Floatplanes

Postby AquilaAudax » Mon Apr 16, 2018 10:02 am

I can't get the image to load ! I am becoming a fully fledged member of geriatrics anonymous !

If you have some information, but need to see the image, drop me an email address and I will send it to you.

Cheers

Ray
Attachments
Short Type 310-A.jpg
Short Type 310-A.jpg (197.39 KiB) Viewed 819 times
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Re: Short Floatplanes

Postby dogsbody » Tue Apr 17, 2018 4:11 pm

Here's the picture Ray was trying to post.

Image


Chris
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with a uniform to wear,
a fast aeroplane to fly,
and something to shoot at?"
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Re: Short Floatplanes

Postby dogsbody » Tue Apr 17, 2018 7:52 pm

A wee experiment, using the image uploader that is available in the reply box.
Attachments
Short Type 310-A.jpg
Short Type 310-A.jpg (197.39 KiB) Viewed 806 times
"What young man could possibly be bored
with a uniform to wear,
a fast aeroplane to fly,
and something to shoot at?"
User avatar
dogsbody
 
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Re: Short Floatplanes

Postby dogsbody » Tue Apr 17, 2018 7:57 pm

Well, there's yer problem, Ray. The damned thing doesn't work. You need to use an image hosting site. there are quite a few out there.
I use Flickr and have tried Village.Photo.There's also Imgur, Fotki, etc. Just find one that works for you.


Chris
"What young man could possibly be bored
with a uniform to wear,
a fast aeroplane to fly,
and something to shoot at?"
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Re: Short Floatplanes

Postby schneiderman » Thu Apr 19, 2018 10:01 pm

Bruce wrote an article in Flight on Short's seaplanes starting in the issue of 14th December 1956 and ending with 4th Jan 1957 (4 issues). It may give a bit more information on how the 310/320 designation was selected than in his book.

Contemporary with the 1916Salmson-powered machine were
two big seaplanes powered by the 310 h.p. Sunbeam Cossack
engine. Apparently four prototypes were ordered at the same
time, but it is doubtful whether more than oneexample of each
was actually built. The two aircraft were quite different in
appearance andin their designed function, butonly thefirst type
went into production. Bythe time that the production machines
were forthcoming, the Cossack engine had been developed to
give more power and was nominally of 320 h.p.
It has already been noted that the Admiralty favoured
numerical designations for their aircraft, but in all earlier cases
the number had been the serial number of a typical machine of
each type. A unique departure wasmade in the case of the 320
h.p. Short seaplane, however, for its designation consisted ofthe
numerical value of the horse-power of its engine, and it was
known as the Short 320. There are, however, several references
to the aircraft as the Short 310.

and

The second type of Short seaplane to have the 310 h.p. Sunbeam
Cossack was a big equal-span machine which resembled the Short
184 closely. It was, however, a completely new aircraft. Its upper
wing was of constant chord (that of the 184 had slight inverse
taper), its centre section was an open structure, the rear float
attachment was made by a strong vee strut (the Short 184 had
two separate struts attached to either side of each float), and the
engine cowling was much bulkier than that of the 184.
The equal-span 310 h.p. Short was known as the Short 310 h.p.
seaplane, Type B: the significance of the Type B suffix is not
known, though it seems reasonable to think that it might have
been intended to distinguish the aircraft from the Short 320. To
its makers at least, the aircraft was also known as the North
Sea Scout.
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Re: Short Floatplanes

Postby AquilaAudax » Fri Apr 20, 2018 9:03 am

Hello Schneiderman,

Thank you very much for sorting out the somewhat confusing situation. It doesn't take much to get me befuddled when I read conflicting information in (assumed) reliable sources.

I am scanning my collection of photo prints and want to have the correct ID for the relevant images. If you know anybody who could be interested in acquiring ~ 3000 B&W prints I would welcome any pointers.

Best regards,

Ray
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Re: Short Floatplanes

Postby schneiderman » Fri Apr 20, 2018 7:43 pm

Hi Ray,

Bruce was pretty reliable with his research into WW1 and earlier aircraft, at least as far as I can tell.

Now, reasonable quality prints of interesting aircraft seem to go for good money on ebay, £5 each is typical, and unusual shots, if they are period originals, can go for far more. Recent sales of Schneider Trophy-related aircraft have climbed up close to £100 on occasion, You could be sitting on a nice pension bonus :) Give us a clue what you have, you could well find some buyers here.
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Re: Short Floatplanes

Postby AquilaAudax » Sat Apr 21, 2018 9:20 am

Hello Schneiderman

The list of prints runs to 51 pages. The countries concerned are as follows:

Argentina, Australia, Austria, Belgium, Brazil, Canada, Czechoslavia, Finland, France, Germany, India, Netherlands, Poland, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, UK, USA, USSR, Yugoslavia.

A small sample can be seen on 1000aircraftphotos as the 'Ray Watkins Collection'.

If anyone wants to see the detail of what I've got, or has particular aircraft for which they are seeking illustrations, please contact me at the following email address: watkinsr@tpg.com.au, and I can respond accordingly.

Best regards,

Ray
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